Virus Survival

Orion Swinehart in WWI Army uniform at Fort Riley, Kansas

I want to share a poem with you that concerns the historic virus known as the Spanish Flu. My grandfather, Orion Wyant Swinehart (b. 1896-d. 1983), was in the thick of that virus. My poem parallels his life during that time with the events of the H1N1 virus history. The indented stanzas of my poem involve his life. The left-margined stanzas contain snippets of the national events from a century ago as well as current statistics. I list my resources after the poem.

I’ve been encouraged with some news reports providing survival statistics. I’m especially happy when good news reaches me about my friends, acquaintances, and family. Unfortunately, the bad news of the infection and mortality rates seem to outweigh those upbeat stories. While reviewing this history in my personal life and writing the following poem I became more hopeful for the future. Maybe this poem will encourage others to reach for endurance. Please be safe, healthy, and find your happiness.

  
 <!--  /* Font Definitions */  @font-face {font-family:Calibri; panose-1:2 15 5 2 2 2 4 3 2 4; mso-font-charset:0; mso-generic-font-family:swiss; mso-font-pitch:variable; mso-font-signature:-469750017 -1073732485 9 0 511 0;}  /* Style Definitions */  p.MsoNormal, li.MsoNormal, div.MsoNormal {mso-style-unhide:no; mso-style-qformat:yes; mso-style-parent:""; margin-top:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-bottom:10.0pt; margin-left:0in; text-align:center; line-height:115%; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:11.0pt; font-family:"Calibri","sans-serif"; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-fareast-font-family:Calibri; mso-fareast-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-bidi-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-bidi-theme-font:minor-bidi;} .MsoChpDefault {mso-style-type:export-only; mso-default-props:yes; font-family:"Calibri","sans-serif"; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-fareast-font-family:Calibri; mso-fareast-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-bidi-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-bidi-theme-font:minor-bidi;} .MsoPapDefault {mso-style-type:export-only; margin-bottom:10.0pt; text-align:center; line-height:115%;} @page WordSection1 {size:8.5in 11.0in; margin:1.0in 1.0in 1.0in 1.0in; mso-header-margin:.5in; mso-footer-margin:.5in; mso-paper-source:0;} div.WordSection1 {page:WordSection1;} --> 
The Great War and 1918 Influenza
 By Rose Klix 
  
 April 6, 1917, hesitant President Wilson led U.S. into war.
 Fort Riley, Kansas, expanded into a staging location
 and combat training site for up to 50,000 men.
             
    May 1917, 21-year-old Orion, an only child,
    nicknamed Piggy, solely ranched 443 acres.
    His father Owen crippled his hand in a harvesting machine. 
  
    A steady flow of flirty girls signed Piggy’s dance card.
    The country band rhythms hushed broadcasts about 
    The Great War torturing nations across the ocean.
  
    June 5, 1917, his military registration card
    described Orion as "short, stout, blue eyes, brown hair,
    not bald" (yet). He proudly wrote, "Single, No dependents."
  
    His mother Minnie screeched, “Demand an exemption.”
    A registrar gritted his teeth. He scowled over his glasses
    and wrote, "Father’s hand -  flimsy excuse".
  
 January 1918, Dr. Loring Miner warned a deadly viral strain 
 struck down the most robust as if by a bullet.
 Public Health neglected to analyze his Kansas report.
  
 March 4, 1918, at Camp Funston, five miles from Fort Riley, 
 a company cook from Haskell County reported feverishly sick. 
 Fast as a haystack fire, 522 men also reported critically ill.
  
    August 26, 1918, the Army assigned Orion to induct 
    troops at Fort Riley before deployment to war zones. 
    Recruits arrived every 30 days to be "run through the mill".
  
 Second Wave, Fall 1918, a more virulent strain returned to the U.S.
 Safe-distance contact and closing of schools, public gatherings, 
 and churches helped diminish the outbreaks to hundreds more deaths.
  
    November 11, 1918, Armistice Day,
    Orion couldn’t journey home yet. His tasks
    changed to processing GI discharges.
             
    January 16, 1919, Piggy’s homecoming day arrived.
    He boarded trains to reach the Elk Creek ranch
    and surprise his folks. His old collie Fanny leapt into his arms.
  
 In January 1919, a Third Wave added hundreds 
 of thousands worldwide influenza deaths. H1N1 
 microscopic enemies inhabited the world until June 1919.
  
January 31, 2021, Our infections totaled 26.2M with 441K deaths.
Grandpa survived a century ago. Social-distancing, careful hygiene,  
and mask wearing may allow his descendants to endure more eras.
 

My Resources: In writing this poem I used a family story my mother repeated to me that my grandfather was sent home from the Army due to the Spanish Flu. I also learned more from reviewing his memoir My Life Story by O.W. Swinehart written in February 1973. It was included in my mother Evelyn Mae (Swinehart) Rose’s memoir In Retrospect A Family History printed in 2004. Her book is preserved by the Rapid City Genealogical Society and saved in the Genealogy section of the Rapid City Main Public Library, South Dakota. I located records of Grandpa’s WWI registration card and an index card from the U.S. Veterans Bureau confirming his service dates.

I also learned history about the H1N1 virus and certain events by researching the following online resources:

  • CDC Disease Control Prevention article 1918 Pandemic Influenza: Three Waves
  • Wikipedia articles titled: Haskell County, Kansas; Spanish Flu; Fort Riley (Kansas); and Funston, (Kansas)
  • Kansas Historical Society articles Flu Epidemic of 1918 and Influenza Sign
  • The New York Times Daily Change article as of Jan 31, 2021

Post and poem Copyright 2021 by Rose Klix

XMAS

Here’s a pseudo-haiku. It’s not exactly the traditional format, but seemed to fit this poem. With all the jingle-belling and sales, sales, sales, try to remember the “reason for the season.” Of course, my books would make great gifts. Have a Happy Holiday, however you celebrate.

Xmas

Christmas has become

just a four-letter word of

commercialism.

– by Rose Klix 1987

Published in Volume II of Pastiche of Poetry

www.RoseKlix.com

South Dakota Wind

Land refused to ground them.

Sea gusts blew first generations

from England to Connecticut.

New York ancestors braved blasts

in Patriot’s Canada, scattered,

buried children, lost connections.

Lumber drew them farther West:

Chicago wagon makers, Kenosha

carpenters. Nebraska tree farmers

hoped for new standing timber.

A final exhaled warm soul

chilled a chinook in Oelrichs.

Prairie grassland blasts blistered

Buffalo Gap near eldest son.

We inherited South Dakota

wind’s tempestuous survival.

Poet’s note: In case you didn’t know, I was born and reared in South Dakota. This poem placed first in the South Dakota State Poetry Society’s 39th Annual contest and was published in their Pasque Petals magazine, Fall 2015 edition. I’ve been eyebrows deep in my father’s genealogy. Our ancestors’ stories inspired this poem.

www.RoseKlix.com

“Fame is a Fickle Food.” Emily Dickinson (1830-1886)

The above quote is attributed to Emily Dickinson. I used her thought as my poem’s theme. The following poem probably falls in the category of Ars Poetica. Some sources say writers should never write about writing. Who wrote that rule?

The South Dakota State Poetry Society (SDSPS) challenged me to write a poem about Writing. The poem won first place in their 39th Annual Contest! Thirty-nine years is a long time to be a respected poetry society. Perhaps they know a thing or two.

Like to write poetry? Go to sdstatepoetrysociety.wordpress.com They are also affiliated with the National Federation of State Poetry Societies (NFSPS). Go to www.nfsps.com to see many opportunities.

Fickle Food

“Fame is a fickle food.” – Emily Dickinson (1830-1886)

Yes, dear Emily,

fame is fickle.

So are our readers’ tastes.

Advertisers and

publishers tempt

us with whatever

fattens their bank accounts.

I’m a fickle writer.

My plate is always filled

with banquet offerings.

I aspire to be:

an understood poet

(a feat in itself),

a staged playwright,

a creative novelist,

a thoughtful essayist,

who also tells engaging stories.

One day I’ll realize

I cannot eat it all.

These nibbles may not fatten my income,

but I enjoy tasting.

My dessert may wait

posthumously or not at all.

Interested to learn more about Rose Klix? Visit www.Rose Klix.com

Zip Code Poem

I was challenged to write a poem about my zip code. The rules were simple – the first line contains the number of words in the first number, second line the number of words in the second number, etc. My zip code is 37918. So the first line contains three words, second line seven words, then nine words, one word and finally the last line is eight words. My poem totaled 28 words. Of course, your zip code would contain different numbers in each line.

I entered the following poem in the South Dakota Poetry Society (SDSPS) 39th Annual Poetry Contest. SDSPS is an affiliate of the National Federation of State Poetry Societies (NFSPS).  My poem won First Place! Thank you, SDSPS judges. I’m grateful to the Pasque Petals editors for publishing the contest results. I love reading through all the fellow poets’ works.

The SDSP’s blog website is sdstatepoetrysociety.wordpress.com The NFSPS website and links to other affiliated state societies is http://nfsps.com Check out all the opportunities to share your work.

Here’s my zip code poem:

37918

If tall, I’d

be kind to little Paul. I’d bend,

hear child whispers in my ear, enjoy his kisses.

I’d

lift high hopes he grows kinder than me.

If you enjoyed this poem, visit www.RoseKlix.com to learn of her poetry and prose collections.

 

 

Feeding Naturally

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

sunflower seed head

The following poem reminds me when we planted sunflowers in our backyard. I enjoyed their faces turning towards the sun. The stalks grew much larger than we imagined. In the fall the birds were crazy for the seeds. I decided we needed to ration throughout the season. We dried the huge seed heads in the garage and pulled them out one by one. Since then we’ve bought the black sunflower seeds for our feeders. But this hasn’t been near as much fun as watching them pull apart the seed heads.

Sunflower Seed Frenzy

by Rose Klix

A gathering of autumn bird

visitors arrived unannounced

at the cardinal’s feeding tree.

He’s learned to share —

sometimes. Picky eaters throw

millet and corn on the ground

to mourning doves and

the blue jay clean-up crew.

The summer birdfeeder emptiness

left them gleaning on their own.

Rob pours a new mixture

into the holders.

Black sunflower seeds

are all-time favorites

to create a feeding frenzy

and envy from the blocked squirrel.

Published as a 39th Annual contest winner in Pasque Petals, The Magazine of the South Dakota Poetry Society, Fall 2015, Volume 89:2

If you like Rose Klix’s poem, you might enjoy her poetry collections and published prose writing. Visit her website at www.RoseKlix.com

Are We Almost There?

by Anonymous

“Are we almost there? Are we almost there?”

said a dying girl as she drew near home.

“Are those our poplar trees that rear

their forms so high ‘gainst the heavens blue dome?”

 

Then she talked of her flowers and she thought of the wall

where the cool waters dashed over the large white stone.

And she thought it would soothe like a fairy spell

could she drink of that fount after her fever was o’er.

 

And oft did she ask “Are we almost there?”

Still her voice grew faint and her flushed cheek pale.

And they strove to soothe her with useless care

as her sighs escaped on the evening gale.

 

While yet so young and her bloom grew less

they had borne her far away to a kindlier time.

For she would not tell it was only distress,

that had gathered life’s roses in its sweet young time.

 

And she had looked where they bade her look

at many a ruin and many a shrine,

at the sculptured niche and the shady nook,

and watched from high places the ruins’ decline.

 

And in secret she sighed for a quaint spot

where she oft had played in childhood’s hour.

Though shrub or floweret marked it not,

it was dearer to her than the gayest bower.

 

They swiftly more swiftly they hurried her on.

But these anxious hearts felt a child despair.

For when the light of that eye was gone,

And the quick beats stopped, she was almost there.

 

(After the poem, my handwritten copy states, “Copied by Philena D. Baily, Lisbon, Iowa 1856” and “Susannah Z. Bassett, Linn Grove, Linn County, Iowa:” The notation after the poem states “ This piece is written about: A young lady who had visited the south for her health but finding that she hourly grew worse her friends hurried her home. On the journey she was very much exhausted and continually inquired, “Are we almost there?” She died just before reaching home. A friend who accompanied her wrote the song.” The poet friend was unidentified in this note.

I found the poem in a collection of my Aunt Delores Hart’s research. I believe my aunt copied it during her research in Linn County, Iowa while looking for her great-grandmother Elmeda Bassett’s genealogy. Elmeda had a sister named Susanna Zerna Bassett. Perhaps Susanna was the unidentified friend who wrote the poem. My copy contained fold lines and water stains. After sitting in a binder for years while we moved and moved, the writing is now difficult to read. Unfortunately, I waited too long  to find it again. My dear aunt had died several years ago so I cannot ask her more about it.. Hopefully, I’ve appropriately preserved the anonymous friend’s sentiment in this typed copy.)

Reincarnation

FontCover2-8-15-72dpi

Most, if not all, my life I’ve believed in reincarnation.

Here is a poem I wrote when sixteen years old.

REINCARNATION by Rose Klix

Past is present, and future came. First is second, the third’s a game.

Restoration to a new dawn, visions of what was are not gone.

Present, future, and past is done. Second is third and first is spun.

Who are you and what do you do? I’m nobody now that I’m through.

Future – now; renewal – begun. Third – infinity; past – rerun.

I am here and I didn’t fall. I’ve come back to seek my call.

– written in 1966 (reprinted from Pastiche of Poetry, Volume II and introduces Past Lives Before Now.)

Newly released prose New Age book Past Lives Before Now reports on twenty-three of my past lives recalled through dreams, déjà vu, visions, and regressions.

www.RoseKlix.com

 

 

 

Favorite Halloween Memories

By Rose Klix

Anyone acquainted with me knows I hate Halloween. Grandma Swinehart said, “Too strong a word for a young lady.” Sorry, Grandma, but I still dislike Halloween. The commercialism is maybe even more ridiculous than Christmastime with all the decorations, flags, orange lights, imitation spider webs, costumes, tons of candy, and rotting toothless pumpkins (which caused a shortage of canned pumpkin). The movies and TV shows try to scare us or poke fun at Fright Night.

We train children to extort sweets as a favor for not pulling a trick on us. History forgot the original meaning for All Hallow’s Eve. I’m surprised churches embrace another pagan holiday. I say let community Trunk or Treat events take over, keep kids safe from going door to door, less disruptive for us residents and the protective barking dogs. Parents should be concerned about strangers’ influences on their children’s sweet tooth cravings. Should civic leaders dare legislate foolishness?

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

However, in the 1980s as a Jaycee Woman in Montana, I hatched an idea to make the holiday a little safer. The news reported vicious people put metal objects, like razorblades or needles, in apples or popcorn balls to cut mouths. I obtained permission from the airport authorities. My proposal encouraged parents to take their children’s haul to the x-ray machine. Several families used this service. None of the treats contained metal. Our Helena chapter received a plaque from the state Jaycee Women organization for a successful Project of the Year. After 9/11 I’m sure TSA won’t agree to this project. Last night’s news claimed this as an urban myth; no one had been harmed in such a manner.
As a child in the late 50s, I admit I collected my share of treats, wore a mask or disguise and ate a lot of my cavity causing loot. From imagination and a lack of money, Mom created our getups. She used cigarette ashes to make Jim grizzled whiskers like a hobo or wrapped him in gauze as a mummy. She granted my wish to be a fairy princess complete with aluminum foil crown and wand. Jim pretended to be a cowboy and shot his toy gun.

Princess Cathy in 1959

Princess Cathy in 1959

Halloween - Copy

Me in mask with Cowboy Jim

Teenagers Jim and I belonged to our church’s youth group. He volunteered to help for the First Congregational Church haunted house. Curious, but afraid of where dead people lay, I walked with him to a neighborhood mortuary. He asked for boxes. The mortician smiled and agreed to deliver several. Jim thought up a cool idea to make a tunnel for kids to crawl through into the fellowship room. Of course, they looked like cardboard boxes and spoiled his spook effect. No one, but Jim, thought about the containers originally held coffins. At the party, the chaperones blindfolded us and said to touch the icky eyeballs (grapes) and squishy intestines (wet spaghetti). We socialized and ate cupcakes, cookies, and punch. I never liked haunted houses. Hayride events were okay unless too cold or scare factors modified the atmosphere. Spooky ghost stories produced nightmares. Not fun. I wore a cross to bed to ward of vampires.
My son Scott enjoyed trick or treating many times. In 1978, when he was seven years old, we used our camping trailer as a temporary home. We barely arrived in Mitchell, South Dakota and didn’t know anybody. I forbade him from going door to door. Instead I bought some chocolate bars, encouraged him to walk outside, and march around the trailer. He knocked on the door and said, “Trick or treat.” I dropped goodies in his plastic pumpkin. He repeated several times until bored with the exercise. Now he and his wife Kim love Halloween. She grew up near Salem, Massachusetts and embraces the concept of all the witches, ghosts, and goblin stories. Perhaps an artistic spirit feeds her imagination.
In the 1990s, I worked at Ellsworth Air Force Base. A co-worker invited us to his wife’s house party. I bought a flimsy female red devil outfit. My husband dressed as the Grim Reaper. The host wore his Air Force uniform long coat. His costume included a flesh-toned body suit. I don’t think he realized his guests saw his cheek bottom from the open split pleat in the back. He had stuffed a nylon stocking and fashioned a gigantic male extremity which dangled between his legs. When he opened his coat and flashed us, we viewed a much different side of this sergeant.
When I sold Tupperware in the 1970s, my manager held a party. She offered extras to anyone who colored their hair green. I sprayed dry powder in my dark hair. Color appeared by the part line. She gave out the points but skipped me. I protested and showed her my scalp. She relented. I stood up for the principle and brushed out the dye.
I’ve not bought a dog outfit for the occasion, but my grand-puppy played dress up this year. Their kitten would prefer to ignore clothing as a waste of money better spent on cat food. TV news stated pet costumes are a growing industry and much encouraged at pet stores. In fact this holiday helps both the US and Chinese economies for several billion dollars.
I dreaded last night’s doorbell for our first Halloween in Knoxville, Tennessee. Our neighbor lady said, “You’ll be mobbed by neighborhood kids. Also expect many driven in from other areas.” We stocked up on more bags of commercial sugary edibles. I remembered our previous neighborhood where a child told us to expect fifty kids. Not one showed up! But we lived on a heavy traffic street. Even that child went to a church event instead.
The rain discouraged some activity, but we greeted plenty of polite gaily dressed children and their escorts between 5:30 and 8:45 pm. My husband watched out the window to answer the door before they rang and irritated me further. Some ran between raindrops and others waited to go out a bit later. My neighbor found out many avoided the rain by reveling at the mall. Another neighbor didn’t turn on his porch light. At least my husband kept us from being anti-social.
Perhaps Halloween serves as a diversion from reality with a chance to imagine yourself as a superhero. I hope you endured a safe holiday – or maybe you enjoyed all the mayhem and candy corn. Happy Halloween! Do you know today is All Saint’s Day?

HALLOWEEN SCARE*
by Rose Klix

Halloween candy,
a dietary scare.
See this sweet?
Leftover candy corn
lasts forever.

*reprinted from Eat, Diet, Repeat poetry chapbook
Visit www.RoseKlix.com.

Pruning Rose


As you watch the video, I invite you to read my poem printed below. I celebrate survivors of breast cancer. Today is the first day for Breast Cancer Awareness Month this year. http://www.nationalbreastcancer.org/breast-cancer-awareness-month
I salute all cancer survivors, empathize with those struggling, and mourn anyone who lost their battle this lifetime. Unfortunately, there are far too many who are touched by cancer.

Pruning Rose
by Rose Klix

Roses thrive with careful pruning,
send out shoots a foot longer than the ones cut off.
Then their blossoms blush with a youthful newness.

With my doctors’ help, cancer pruned me.
They stripped away my control
and attempted a complete removal of my dignity.

They replaced my once noticeable femininity
with long scars and promised to rebuild my breasts
after my physical healing was complete.

But proud, I stand with the Amazons, who chose
similar transformation for better archery skills.
I am readied to fight for my life with chemotherapy.

I endure side effects and digestive discomforts.
People say I look good in spite of skin blemishes.
Even on my worst days, my husband takes care of me.

Today my crown is devoid of hair. My friend and I cry.
I’m not ready for my world to view a GI Jane style.
She encourages me to shop for feminine sassy hats.

I am not strong. I am not brave.
I am a survivor, who refuses to hide.
God pruned me. He expects I will blossom more fully.

– written in 2010

Please visit www.RoseKlix.com
Like her author page https://www.facebook.com/authorRoseKlix
Connect on Twitter: http://twitter.com/RoseKlix
Link to her on LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/profile/view